New study provides information on the role of forage fish in the California Current Ecosystem

Farallon Institute scientists Amber Szoboszlai, Julie Thayer, and William Sydeman co-authored a paper for a study that examined the role of forage fish in the California Current Ecosystem, and the results of this study were published in the journal Ecological Modelling.  In this research, the authors developed and used a food web model to analyze which species are predators of forage fish (such as sardine and herring) and how much the predators' diets are composed of forage fish species.  Results of this study show that many predator species consume multiple forage fish species (rather than focusing on just one type), which suggests that management on the ecosystem level rather than a species-specific level is likely to be a more successful approach to conservation.  Likewise, this information suggests that declines in forage fish populations can have far-reaching effects in marine food webs.  

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Bill Sydeman testifies to the State Senate on climate conditions during the 2015-2016 closed Dungeness crab fishery season

On April 28, Bill Sydeman was one of a group of scientists who testified before the California State Senate Joint Committee on Fisheries and Aquaculture. The topic of the hearing was "Crab season and domoic acid: lessons learned", and Bill spoke in the section for "Ocean conditions, the West Coast algae bloom and domoic acid levels: Now, over the next year, and into the future". More information about the hearing can be found here, and video of the hearing is archived here (scroll down to 4/28/2016 Joint Committee on Fisheries and Aquaculture).  The slides from Bill's talk can be found in Presentations.

Photo by J. Newton, California Department of Fish and Wildlife

Photo by J. Newton, California Department of Fish and Wildlife